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The best of Art in High Definition
lyghtmylife:

Bronzino
[Italian Mannerist Painter, 1503-1572]
Venus, Cupid, Folly and Time [Allegory of the Triumph of Venus], 1540-1545
oil on panel, 146 × 116 cm
National Gallery, London, UK

lyghtmylife:

Bronzino

[Italian Mannerist Painter, 1503-1572]

Venus, Cupid, Folly and Time [Allegory of the Triumph of Venus]1540-1545

oil on panel, 146 × 116 cm

National Gallery, London, UK

Cornelis Corneliszoon van Haarlem
 Fall of the Titans (or the Rebel Angels)
c.1588

Cornelis Corneliszoon van Haarlem

Fall of the Titans (or the Rebel Angels)

c.1588

(Source: givemesomesoma)

gibisoma:

Lucas Cranach the Younger
Portrait of the Elector John Frederic the Magnanimous of Saxony, 1578

gibisoma:

Lucas Cranach the Younger

Portrait of the Elector John Frederic the Magnanimous of Saxony, 1578

(Source: dowland)

Léon Maxime Faivre 
Two Mothers 
1888
Musee d’Orsay, Paris
Oil on canvas, 242 x 182 cm

Léon Maxime Faivre

Two Mothers

1888

Musee d’Orsay, Paris

Oil on canvas, 242 x 182 cm

(Source: gandalf1202, via nataliakoptseva)

Vincent van Gogh 
Self Portrait

Vincent van Gogh 

Self Portrait

John Collier
Priestess of Delphi
1891

John Collier

Priestess of Delphi

1891

Ilya Repin
Sadko
1876
323 x 230 cm
Russian Museum, St. Petersburg, Russia

Ilya Repin

Sadko

1876

323 x 230 cm

Russian Museum, St. Petersburg, Russia

Paolo Uccello
The Battle of San Romano 
c.1438-40
182 x 320 cm, Egg tempera with walnut & linseed oil on poplar
National Gallery, London
This brilliantly structured and colourful painting depicts part of the battle of San Romano that was fought between Florence and Siena in 1432. The central figure is Niccolò Mauruzi da Tolentino on his white charger, the leader of the victorious Florentine forces, who is identifiable by the motif of Knot of Solomon on his banner.  This panel is one of a set of three showing incidents from the same battle. The other two are in the Louvre, Paris, and the Uffizi, Florence. This painting and its two companion panels were commissioned by the Bartolini Salimbeni family in Florence sometime between 1435 and 1460: only the Uffizi panel is signed. Lorenzo de’ Medici so coveted them that he had them forcibly removed to the Medici palace. The pictures may originally have had arched tops designed to fit below Gothic vaults. They were made into rectangular panels in the 15th century, possibly by Uccello himself. Uccello was much preoccupied with one point linear perspective, seen here in the foreshortening of shapes and arrangement of broken lances.

Paolo Uccello

The Battle of San Romano

c.1438-40

182 x 320 cm, Egg tempera with walnut & linseed oil on poplar

National Gallery, London

This brilliantly structured and colourful painting depicts part of the battle of San Romano that was fought between Florence and Siena in 1432. The central figure is Niccolò Mauruzi da Tolentino on his white charger, the leader of the victorious Florentine forces, who is identifiable by the motif of Knot of Solomon on his banner.

This panel is one of a set of three showing incidents from the same battle. The other two are in the Louvre, Paris, and the Uffizi, Florence. This painting and its two companion panels were commissioned by the Bartolini Salimbeni family in Florence sometime between 1435 and 1460: only the Uffizi panel is signed. Lorenzo de’ Medici so coveted them that he had them forcibly removed to the Medici palace. The pictures may originally have had arched tops designed to fit below Gothic vaults. They were made into rectangular panels in the 15th century, possibly by Uccello himself. Uccello was much preoccupied with one point linear perspective, seen here in the foreshortening of shapes and arrangement of broken lances.

(Source: gandalf1202)